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November 2010 Archives

Study: Children's ER Visits Down After Cold Medicine Recalls

In October 2007, manufacturers of over-the-counter cough and cold medicines for the very youngest of children voluntarily withdrew all such products from store shelves after numerous complaints that the products posed a safety risk to infants and children. Pediatricians stated that the products were ineffective in young children, and were prone to accidental overdoses resulting in extreme drowsiness, an increased heart rate, and even deaths. Seeking to avoid products liability lawsuits and bad press, manufacturers voluntarily took cough and cold medicines, mostly syrups, off the shelves.

Keeping Children Safe This Holiday Season

As Thanksgiving approaches, dedicated shoppers know that Black Friday, arguably the best shopping day of the year, is not far behind. Many Americans get all of their holiday shopping done in that single day, if they are willing to get up early and are able to continue to shop all day. As parents begin to fulfill their children's holiday wishes, officials advise that they keep toy safety in mind in order to avoid injuries caused by defective products. Luckily, keeping children safe from harmful or dangerous toys does not require much more than simple common sense.

Fatal Camry Crash Caused by Ongoing Toyota Defects

After several months of reports of malfunctions, car accidents, and products liability lawsuits regarding defects in Toyota vehicles, followed by several more months of a Toyota public relations campaign, it seemed that the Toyota gas pedal defect controversy was - finally - a thing of the past. However, after two people were killed and two were injured when a 2008 Toyota Camry crashed into a rock wall in Utah, officials and consumers have begun to question whether the millions of Toyota vehicle recalls actually solved the gas pedal problems.

In Car Crash, Crumpling Front Seat Causes Back Seat Injuries

In an ongoing effort to improve the safety of motor vehicles and reduce the occurrence of injuries from car accidents, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration continually updates its safety requirements, most recently with the stricter crash testing standards and procedures. However, there is one standard that has not been updated in over 40 years, and advocates say that it is causing severe brain injuries in backseat passengers, most of whom are children.

New Jersey Nursing Home May Enforce Arbitration Agreements

As any family with a loved one in a nursing home is well aware, it can be difficult to monitor the care situation from a distance or when visiting in short increments. Therefore, nursing home neglect is not easy to identify or stop. This inevitably leads to many lawsuits by residents and family members against nursing homes. After a recent New Jersey appellate court decision, however, plaintiffs may be limited in their available courses of action against negligent nursing homes.

New Jersey Remains the Only State with Drowsy Driving Law

As research continues into drowsy driving, more is learned about the dangers of operating a motor vehicle while sleep deprived. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, one in every six fatal motor vehicle accidents is caused by a fatigue-impaired driver. Because of these risks and in response to the lack of public knowledge about this dangerous trend, this week has been declared Drowsy Driving Prevention Week across the country.

New Jersey Students Injured in School Bus Collision

This week, approximately 150 New Jersey high school students were on a field trip when they were involved in a serious bus accident. According to reports, the brakes of one of the four buses carrying the students allegedly failed, causing two buses to collide. One of the bus drivers and ten students suffered injuries requiring them to be taken to area hospitals.

New Law Requires New Jersey Drivers to Remove Snow from Vehicles

Last month, an amended law went into effect which requires drivers to remove all snow and ice from their vehicles before driving on New Jersey roads. Officials say that taking just a few minutes to clear the hazardous material could avoid a car accident, property damage, injuries, and death.

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